Strange anatomical structures in the hoof corium of the horse

posted in: Allgemein | 0
Suspensory apparatus of the equine pedal bone P3
Suspensory apparatus of the equine coffin bone P3
Detail view of the suspensory apparatus of the equine pedal bone
Detail view of the suspensory apparatus of the equine pedal bone
Horse hoof plastinate with distal phalanx (P3), hoof corium and wall.
Horse hoof plastinate with distal phalanx (P3), hoof corium and wall.
Detail view of the structure which might be part of the suspensory apparatus of the distal phalanx in the horse hoof
Detail view of the structure which might be part of the suspensory apparatus of the distal phalanx in the horse hoof

High resolution anatomical photographs of SI-Sheet plastinates of the hoof show structures which reach vom the coffin bone into the hoof corium. These might be part of the suspensory apparatus of the distal phalanx. I had discussed with Chris Pollitt in the past whether it would be possible to visualise the mesocopic details of the suspensory apparatus of the distal phalanx in sheet plastination specimens. With the help of the SI (Selective Impregnation) – method it might be possible.

I will examine more hoof plastinates and check whether these structures can be found in all hooves or if they might be a result of hoof disease like eg. laminitis. Meanwhile I am looking forward to your comments and ideas.

You can also find this picture in slightly higher resolution together with many other interesting pictures of the horse hoof anatomy in the Equine anatomy gallery at the HC Biovision website.

Rabbit teeth anatomy – why do tooth problems cause eye and nose symptoms?

posted in: Allgemein, Anatomy | 0

Rabbit teeth anatomy

Length of rabbit front teeth in the jaws.

Anatomical photographs provide detailed insights

Real anatomical sheet plastinate of a rabbit head

Rabbit teeth reach very far into the jaws. They end close to the eye and nose cavity. This is why teeth problems in rabbits can be misinterpreted as eye disease or infection of the nose. The real anatomical plastinate of the rabbit head allows better understanding of the topography of the rabbit teeth and other structures of the head. The real plastinated specimens and the high resolution scientific photographs can be also found as Detail Vision Offers in Etsy: Rabbit head sheet plastinate and photographs in Etsy

Horse hoof anatomy preparation – new plastination technique

posted in: Techniques | 0
Equine hoof anatomy teaching specimen
Prototype embedded silicone plastination hoof slice

A new kind of embedded silicone plastination specimen. It combines the realistic 3-dimensional vision of anatomical details in silicone plastination with the attractive and convenient hands-on approach of embedded specimens

Bone fracture in a horse foot – long pastern bone fracture

posted in: Anatomy | 0
Fraktur Fesselbein Pferd
Fracture of the long pastern bone in a horse foot

The sheet plastinate shows how the fracture goes through almost the entire long pastern bone. These fracture can usually not be treated in horses. During treatment horses develop severe problems also in the other foots: see plastination of laminitis in the equine hoof.

Blood vessel anatomy

posted in: Allgemein, Exhibitions, Techniques | 1
Anatomie der Blutgefaesse
Vascularisation of the fish head

The detail of the fish head vascularisation demonstrates how the transparency of the sheet plastinate can show the whole complexity of the blood vessel anatomy in one single anatomical specimen. You can also find this picture and many more in the plastination-archive.

Plastination 2.0 at the congress of the European Association of Veterinary Anatomists (EAVA)

posted in: Allgemein, Ethics, Exhibitions, Techniques | 0

The use of plastinates in schools, museums and other institutions was the subject of an oral presentation from Dr. Christoph von Horst at the EAVA congress in Stara Zagora (Bulgaria). Veterinary anatomists from all of Europe, the US, South America, New Zealand and Australia heard about how plastinates can be adapted to the needs of a wider range of users. The tension between aesthetics and the scientific message played a major role in the speach. Co-author of the presentation was Prof. Dr. Robert W. Henry (President of the World Association of Veterinary Anatomists). Henry and von Horst also presented a scientific poster that suggests a change of the anatomical nomenclature (Nomina anatomica veterinaria) for the equine maxillary sinuses.

1 2 3